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Recalibrate Your Success and Thrive Forward

8 great lessons on defining the meaning of personal success and thriving in life.

Photo by Benjamin Davies on Unsplash

Success. What does it mean to you? How will you know if you’ve “made it” or when you will finally “make it”? I was in the company of a friend travelling to Enugu State in November 2017. At the bus terminus, while waiting for the vehicle to fill up and take off, I glimpsed at one of the eBooks on my Samsung Galaxy Note 3. Which author or title should I read now?

Hibernating in my glowing rectangle for several weeks past, Arianna Huffington’s Thrive came to mind. Right from the very first page, the riveting Thrive begun with its major themes. These were the author’s call to “Redefine what success means to us as individuals.” and “What it means to live the good life” The introduction ended with a call to action. Life’s objectives should not be just “to take our place in the world, but to change the world.”

These are resounding and paradigm-shifting ideas. And I told myself, “Man, you are up to some heavy stuff here. You had better make out the time to really read it.” I read a few more pages and turned off my Moon Reader e-book app.

Of course, the phone was still on. Thereafter, most of the remaining traveling time was spent taking pictures of all interestingness encountered on that trip. There were four of us in the sardine-packed bus.

Going on at a leisurely pace, I’ve since finished the book, Sorry, I’m a slow but persistent reader. I actually read slowly, even though I can read faster. Like a tasty bar of Swiss chocolate, you don’t savor or enjoy a splendid book by rushing through its pages. The following are some lessons garnered from Thrive.

Redefine success

Success should not be defined by the metrics of mere material attainments, money, and power. According to the author, there is a third metric for defining genuine success. Going beyond money and power, this Third Metric has these four pillars for its foundation.

  • Well-being,
  • Wisdom,
  • Wonder and
  • Giving.

The wrong definition of success results in people having to suffer incalculable losses in terms of the price they pay at the end in terms of health, well-being, relationships, and happiness. To one and to all, these losses will continue… Click To Tweet

Five hours later we arrived at Nsukka town. From there, we proceeded to the village. Our stay there was just for the night. We returned safely back to Port Harcourt the following day.

Here are eight life long lessons

1. Make room for wisdom, wonder, and giving.

People who are genuinely thriving in their lives are those who have made room for well-being, wisdom, wonder, and giving.

2. Live more, hyper-connect less.

Don’t be too busy that you don’t have time to live. Hyper-connectivity of our digital era is often an unfulfilling version of genuine connection that can prevent us from being deeply connected with those closest to us, including ourselves and our innermost being, and the wisdom residing therein.

3. Prioritize your life or watch it slip through your grasp.

You don’t have to wait until the occurrence of a tragedy or death before prioritizing what matters most in your life. Those who cannot take necessary breaks to stop, ponder, and wonder may just have life pass them by before they realize it.

4. Don’t substitute your wants for your real needs.

Technology, while being able to give us what we want doesn’t always give us what we need. Over-reliance on these tools diminishes our self-awareness and our ability to listen.

The power technology puts at our disposal often lowers the ability of people including executives to be empathetic. We’ve all seen it or being involved in it. People using their phones to take Instagram and Facebook update shots instead of stepping out to offer help and relief.

The power technology puts at our disposal often lowers the ability of people including executives to be empathetic. We’ve all seen it or being involved in it. People using their phones to take Instagram and Facebook update shots instead… Click To Tweet

5. Cultivate a healthy relationship with technology.

Monitor and check how healthy your relationship is to technology, and the associated social media tools. They can either help us bear witness more powerfully or get more obsessively distracted as “Weapons of Mass Distraction” (WMD).

Photo by Chris Curry on Unsplash
Monitor and check how healthy your relationship is to technology, and the associated social media tools. They can either help us bear witness more powerfully or get more obsessively distracted as “Weapons of Mass Distraction” Click To Tweet

6. Don’t hinder your own happiness.

So much of the time, what is standing between us and satisfaction is … us. Click To Tweet

Success doesn’t depend on getting every single thing right, but instead relies on identifying a few key priorities and fashioning them into powerful levers.

7. Reinforce good deeds — take and give.

This entails the cultivation of compassion and empathy. The author reminds us of the words of Dr Ervin Staub that, “Goodness like evil often begins in small steps.” In other words goodness and evil are self-reinforcing.

Goodness like evil often begins in small steps.
~ Dr Ervin Staub
In other words, goodness and evil are self-reinforcing.

8. Stay connected with life’s true essence.

In our quest for the upward rise on the ladder of worldly success, it is very vital to stay connected to the essence of whom we are by taking care of ourselves along the way and also reaching out to others. Always take breaks to; stop, ponder and wonder. Life effectively slip from those who choose to do otherwise and by the time they realize it, it’s already too late. Life is soon over.

Always take breaks to; stop, ponder and wonder. Life effectively slip from those who choose to do otherwise and by the time they realize it, it’s already too late. Life is soon over. Click To Tweet

Now, over to you. From now on, how will you measure your success – post COVID-19 and beyond?

SOURCE:
Copyright by © Arianna Huffington; Thrive — The Third Metric to Defining Success And Creating A Life of Well-Being, Wisdom, and Wonder; Harmony Books, New York, 2014

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